The click and “thank you for your purchase” convenience of online shopping has made impulse buying an easy gambit. Low prices, catchy ads and super-slick user-friendly experiences result in the overstimulated shopper who neglects to ask, “do I REALLY need another pair of jeans?” at checkout. Here are three tips to help you avoid impulse buys, reducing the depletion of natural resources and protecting the planet.

 

  1. Browse new solutions

Today’s products with “green” certifications are like the Wild West – little government oversight and free rein of claims on environmental impact. Before going shopping, take the time to research your intended purchase, understand the materials and processes used to make the product, and evaluate the brand’s positioning on sustainability. To find greener options, look for recycled materials, which supports the circular economy where waste is turned into ingredients to make something new. For guidance on green labels, browse our article on 8 Certifications and Standards.

 

  1. Bundle your online purchases

Buying goods from local online stores is often better for the environment for one fundamental reason: logistics consolidation. E-tailers tend to maximize orders before delivery runs, while retail stores may use multiple delivery trips and be more costly in terms of CO₂ emissions and miles traveled. Since each online delivery puts a vehicle on the road, shoppers can group their purchases into fewer packages and consolidate orders into a single trip for a less-polluting alternative.

 

  1. Build your inner awareness

Experts agree that today’s user experiences can emotionally trigger shoppers to spend more than they intended to. A recent survey shows that consumers spend EUR 4,554 per year on impulse buys. However, building awareness of the luring adverts will help us prioritize our needs to meet more essential and long-term financial goals and curb unnecessary spending. To find out more about sustainability and fashion, browse our latest article on Eco Fashion: A Beginner’s Guide to Feeling Good about What You Wear.

 

 

Author: Naomy Gmyrek