03 Mai 2018

Volcom is making waves with sustainability

Category: Blog, News

We spotted an exciting interview with Marina Hamm, the designer creating swimwear for action-sports brand Volcom. We would like to share few thoughts from her interview that we believe could be inspiring for others.

In this interview, Marina focuses on the ingredient, ECONYL® regenerated nylon used in about 50% of Volcom’s swim line, which is made out of waste that’s been rescued from landfills and oceans around the world. What seems to impress Marina Hamm as a designer is the infinite possibilities that ECONYL® as an ingredient is offering her. Despite the fact that ECONYL® nylon comes from recycled waste and is 100% regenerated, it is no different than virgin nylon in terms of quality and performance.

It’s just like any other fabric; you wouldn’t even know … It’s not a lesser product. It’s not like you’re doing good for the environment but it doesn’t feel as good, or it has a certain smell. People wouldn’t even know.

Later on in the interview, she stresses the fact that designers have no limitation when using ECONYL® yarn as it performs just like traditional nylon but has a lighter footprint on the environments — up to 80% Global Warming potential reduction compared to conventional nylon.

It’s amazing; I geek out over the science of it … The fabric is just as good as fabric nylon, the same as non-sustainable fabric. I get to design as I normally do. I didn’t have to worry about it not being as strong or not as good quality … my goal was to design beautiful swimwear, but that also happens to be sustainable.

Her interview is inspiring because she, with Volcom, is an example of the possibilities offered by our ECONYL® nylon, which is sustainable but doesn’t mean a compromise in quality or the design phase, leaving, therefore, license to let your imagination go.

There’s a feeling of guilt of creating something new, but if I create something that’s really not new, I feel OK about it,” she said.

READ the interview by Laylan Connelly on The Orange County Register.

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